Friday, March 10, 2017

AASWomen Newsletter for March 10, 2017

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 10, 2017
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Christina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. A daily routine    
2. The Gender Gap in Publications
3. Why Did the House Science Committee Overlook NASA's Former Chief Scientist? 
4. Here’s What a Day Without Women Will Actually Look Like
5. Jocelyn Bell Burnell: Astrophysicist says women in science need culture change 
6. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
8. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter



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1. A daily routine
From: Sarah Tuttle via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

I approach each morning with a certain tension. I pick up my phone (a terrible way to start the day, you’d think I’d have figured that out by now, I definitely do not recommend it.). I skim twitter, the New York Times, and whatever else has accumulated overnight. It isn’t that there wasn't oppression or ordeals before - but I (perhaps delusionally) thought I knew the shape of them. Now there is a certain wild card feel that I can’t quite shake… We’re back with another immigration executive order.

Read more at


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2. The Gender Gap in Publications
From: Alexander Rudolph [alrudolph_at_cpp.edu]

This study reports on the analysis of research publications in Elsevier’s Scopus database. It finds that “women researchers publish fewer papers on average than men and are less likely to collaborate internationally and to undertake research that cuts across the corporate and academic sectors. At the same time, a report on the findings notes there is little difference between papers published by men and women in impact as measured by citations and downloads.”

Read more at


See summarized data at


Find the original report at


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3. Why Did the House Science Committee Overlook NASA's Former Chief Scientist? 
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

“That’s a good question,” responded one person at the committee’s offices.

Despite a lengthy testimony and detailed answers to numerous questions about NASA’s programs, including those of interest to the public, Dr. Ellen Stofan, the only witness who had actually worked at NASA, “didn’t appear at all in the committee’s Twitter feed”.

“… Stofan’s omission prompted an outcry. “Don’t ask questions about encouraging young people to get into STEM and then make it look like it's only for old white guys,” one woman wrote...”

Read more at


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4. Here’s What a Day Without Women Will Actually Look Like
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

“Corporate leaders understand the impact of shoppers, especially women, pulling back their support,” Mallory says, citing the Grab Your Wallet movement, an anti-Trump boycott. “The sacrifice of a day will send a resounding message to our administration, corporations that support the administration, and any other influencers. We are prepared to make serious sacrifices to ensure our democracy is upheld.”

Read more at


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5. Jocelyn Bell Burnell: Astrophysicist says women in science need culture change 
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Jocelyn Bell Burnell, an astrophysicist and visiting professor at the University of Oxford, advocates the need for a “culture change” to make science careers more inviting to women. 

"When I got engaged to be married, it was assumed that I would quit science and be a housewife," she said. "It was considered shameful if a married woman had to work - it implied that her husband couldn't earn enough to keep her."

Read more at


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6. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org 

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address. 

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting. 

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email: 

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like. 

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list) 

To unsubscribe by email: 

Send email to aaswlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like. 

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings: 


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8. Access to Past Issues

  
Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.